Performance Management Blog

Addressing Disruptive Behaviors at Work

Posted by Jamie Resker on Dec 5, 2013 12:15:00 PM

Most of us would rather have a root canal (without the Novocain) than give an employee feedback about poor performance, particularly when it relates to a behavior based issue. Yet, we will eagerly discuss or more accurately complain about these issues to colleagues, friends or family. So what stops us from providing feedback to the employee?

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Topics: difficult conversations, constructive criticism, addressing performance issues, do's and don't of performance feedback, address bad behavior, difficult employees, disruptive behavior

Addressing Bad Behavior at Work

Posted by Jamie Resker on Dec 5, 2013 11:15:00 AM

Most of us would rather have a root canal (without the Novocain) than give an employee feedback about poor performance, particularly when it relates to a behavior based issue. Yet, we will eagerly discuss or more accurately complain about these issues to colleagues, friends or family. So what stops us from providing feedback to the employee?

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Topics: difficult conversations, addressing bad behaviors, Address Performance Issues, constructive criticism, difficult employees

The Worst Way to Give Performance Feedback

Posted by Jamie Resker on Aug 5, 2011 10:29:00 AM

Most of what HR professionals (this included me) have taught our leaders about giving performance feedback and addressing performance issues is flat out wrong. 

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Topics: difficult conversations, do's and dont's of performance management, performance feedback training, performance feedback, performance management training, do's and don't of performance feedback

Avoiding Difficult Performance Discussions is Not Nice

Posted by Jamie Resker on Oct 18, 2010 10:06:00 PM

One of the excuses we commonly hear as a reason for not actively engaging in dialogue with employees regarding their performance is “We’re really nice at XYZ organization” or “We're non-confrontational". Translation, “We have people who are underperforming, but we’d rather not have those conversations.” Or, “It’s just easier to let the underperformance continue as is; I’ll just focus on my A and B level players.” And finally, “What would we say and how would the person on the receiving end react? We’d rather not go there.”

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Topics: difficult conversations, employee development, underperformance, performance feedback, performance management, avoiding conflict, ignoring performance issues